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Sunday, March 26, 2017

Thesis of Disruptive Behavior - 11 Chapter 4 Overt Inattentiveness

THE EFFECTS OF DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOR TO THE SCHOOL PERFORMANCE OF GRADE IV & V PUPILS IN CABANGLASAN DISTRICT

Click here to guide you by Chapters - CHAPTER I; CHAPTER IICHAPTER IIIChapter IVChapter V


CHAPTER IV - Table 11
Presentation, Analysis and Interpretation of Data 
Table 11 - Overt Inattentiveness
Statement
Mean
QD

1.    The pupil is usually observed glancing elsewhere while I am explaining.(


4.26


HDB
2.    The pupil can't wait the recess time for him/ her to eat the snack.
4.02
DB
3.    The pupil is caught chewing bubble gums or sweets during class hours.
3.72
DB
4.    The pupil was   yawning or sleeping, which her/his classmates make jokes to wake her/him up
4.02
DB
5.    When this pupil is ask to read notebooks or books, he was not doing it, instead reading not relevant to the topic.
4.07
DB
6.    The pupil was caught operating electronic devices such as cellphones, Sports, PDA'S, MP3 player, Gameboys, laptops and etc. while the class is going on.( explain as lowest result)
2.26
LDB
7.   The pupil needs to call his/her attention now and then to listen my explanation..(explain the highest result)
4.26
HDB
8. The pupil always can't answer instant questions after my explanations related to subject matters.

4.00
DB
Mean of Overt Inattentiveness
3.83
DB

Note:
Scale
Range Interval
Qualitative Description
5
4:21-5:00
Highly Disruptive Behavior (HDB)
4
3:41-4:20
Disruptive Behavior (DB)
3
2:61-3:40
Moderately Disruptive Behavior (MDB)
2
1:81-2:60
Less Disruptive Behavior (LDB)
1
1:00-1:80
Never Occurred (NO)


            The overt inattentiveness of grade four and five pupils was summarized in
Table 12.www.christchurchpsychology.co.nz 5/6/2003 Page 2 of 3 stressed
that middle childhood such as primary pupils exhibited a disruptive behavior
within normal range of inattentiveness such as may not persist very long with a
task to do, such as reading an assigned book or homework, or a task that
requires concentration, such as cleaning something. Children and adolescents
may be easily distracted from tasks that they do not want to perform.
        Behavior signaling an inattention problem: At times the child misses some
instructions and explanations in school, begins a number of activities without
completing them, has some difficulties completing games with other children or
grownups, becomes distracted, and tends to give up easily. The child may not
complete or succeed at new activities, has some social deficiency, and does
not pick up subtle social cues from others.
Behavior signaling the possible presence of ADHD, predominantly inattentive type: The child has significant school and social problems, often shifts activities, does not complete tasks, is messy, and is careless about school work. The child may start tasks prematurely and without appropriate review as if he were not listening, has difficulty organizing tasks, dislikes activities that require close concentration, is easily distracted, and is often
forgetful.
            A child with a behaviour disorder such as a learning disability, developmental delay or attention- problems may find it difficult to follow instructions, execute complex routines like getting dressed or wait for what they want.  Children who have a delay development can’t move and think as the way the normal children can do.  They were usually slow, acted late that makes them behind to the specific time required.
Elias, M.J., “Guidelines for Educators” 2004, said that a certain study showed  that all parents had experienced parenting their own children. In addition, knowledge about what can be expected from children at different developmental stages and knowledge about the principles of behavior change contribute strongly to parenting styles.  Two parents may have similar ideas about parenting or may be diametrically opposed in their beliefs and practices. Parenting styles may decrease, maintain or inadvertently increase disruptive behavior in children.  And he stressed in his article that many children with disruptive behavior meet criteria for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and/or havoc morbid mood and anxiety disorders; they might also have language and/or learning disorders.  The common overt inattentiveness in school classroom exhibited by children is sleeping, reading the paper in class and keep doing things such as scrabbling their bags and etc. and not listening while the instructors are explaining.
             Table 12 shows that the grade four and five pupils were having a highly disruptive behaviour when their teachers were explaining, they keep glancing elsewhere ( X=4.26).  So it needs for their teachers to call their attention now and then to listen to their teachers’  explanation (X=4.26).  This can be deduced due to the fact that pupil was not interested to listen the lesson, instead the mind was preoccupied with lots of things.   While it shows also that the grade IV and V pupils were not fond  on operating electronic devices such as cellphones, Sports, PDA'S, MP3 player, Gameboys, laptops and etc. while the class is going on (X= 2.26),  that made less disruptive during classroom instruction.  This may be because in rural areas, operating devices similar to those cellphones and laptops were not common to pupils considering that majority of them came from poor families and can’t afford to provide such kind of devices.  The teacher observed that there was only a disruptive behaviour when pupil wasaskedto read notebooks or books, the pupil not doing it, instead read irrelevant to the subject matters X=4.07.This is because the pupil has a predominantly inattentive type, the child has significant school and social problems, often shifts activities, does not complete tasks, is messy, and is careless about schoolwork. Disruptive behaviour  was exhibited in the class every time the teacher stopped the pupil eating snacks while the class was going on and reminded to eat it during recess time (X=4.02). Another disruptive behaviour was the teacher gave enough more effort to catch the attention of the pupil to be interested of the subject matters not to be sleepy/sleeping or be yawning during class instruction (X=4.02).  When the pupil was glancing anywhere, sleepy, eating, chewing gums and some other acts and not absorbing the lesson while the teacher   was explaining, usually the pupil could not answer instant questions after the teachers’ explanations(X=4.00) and that shows again a disruptive behaviour.

((X=4.02)

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